is a strength. If you follow the above tips then there is every chance that you will successfully go on to pass the interview and become an Air Traffic Controller. About the Author 收费员与司机僵持 许晴深夜晒湿发照

Reference-and-Education Licensed air traffic controllers will find that the interview process is not terribly gruelling, nor will it be as lengthy as the process required for those enrolling with a company like NATS. However, there will be some very specific things that an interviewer is looking for during this time. What will an interviewer want to know? • Examples of how you have previously handled emergency situations This might be an example from your professional life, or your personal life. The important thing is to show your interviewer how you handle situations that normally engender panic in other individuals. • How well do you deal with pressure? Pressure is a constant factor in air traffic control, even on "normal" days of the year. How do you handle pressure? Do you thrive, or do you buckle under it? Do you long for a position where there is no pressure, or high expectations? Your interviewer needs to know that you can remain calm and poised in these situations. • How well do you work with your colleagues? The world of air traffic control is not about a single person – it is a group environment. In order to thrive in this environment, you need to be able to work well as part of a team. You need to have a team mentality, to be able to listen to your colleagues suggestions and act on sound advice or information. • How you would handle specific scenarios that might arise Numerous scenarios can arise in the world of aviation, most of them potentially disastrous, thus the need for air traffic controllers. However, your interviewer will be very interested in just how you might handle these situations. Give accurate, honest answers here – do not try to give the answer you feel the interviewer wants to hear. • How do you deal with criticism from a superior or colleague? There will be times that your judgement is criticised by your colleagues or by a supervisor. How will you handle that criticism? This is part of being able to work well in a team environment. • What do you consider your strengths? Your strengths tell the interviewer quite a bit about you as a person, as well as your potential role within the unit. They also give the interviewer an idea of where to slot you into the rotation/line-up. • What do you consider your weaknesses? Your weak areas also play a role in determining how valuable you will be to the airport. These should be given honestly. Try to provide a weakness that actually, underneath the surface, is a strength. If you follow the above tips then there is every chance that you will successfully go on to pass the interview and become an Air Traffic Controller. About the Author: 相关的主题文章:

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